CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF SNOW

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Celebrating a rich history and heritage, Treble Cone marks its 50th anniversary this season as a key player in the Southern Lakes ski industry. Back in 1968 a determined group of skiers, mountaineers, financiers, entrepreneurs, local landowners and construction experts – including Kiwi legends Sir Edmund Hillary and Sir Tim Wallis – joined forces to create a ski area which they envisaged would become one of the best in the world.

Treble Cone’s first rope tow was installed in 1969 and the pace of development has been rapid over the past 50 years – today the mountain boasts a range of contemporary lift and base facilities.

It is often referred to as the “hidden gem” of the Southern Lakes ski areas and when visitors and locals discover just what Treble Cone has to offer, they are hard pushed to ski or snowboard anywhere else.

Thirty-five minutes’ drive from Wanaka, en route to the Mount Aspiring National Park, Treble Cone has stunning views and even from the car park, there’s a panoramic outlook to Lake Wanaka and the Southern Alps.

Renowned for its 550 hectares of skiable terrain, which ranges from 30% to more than 50% larger than surrounding ski areas, and the longest vertical in the Southern Alps at 700m, Treble Cone is an ideal destination for all skiing and snowboarding levels.

“That sheer size of TC means lift queues are a rarity, even on a powder day, and slopes are wide open and crowd-free,” says general manager Toby Arnott.

The ski area is recognised for its natural bowls and challenging upper mountain runs, but in recent years rewarding intermediate terrain has also been developed. The mountain is unique among Southern Lakes ski areas with its sunny, warm northwest-facing learners and beginners area.

The vision of Treble Cone’s pioneers to deliver a significant New Zealand snow experience lives on today, reflected in the commitment of everyone involved with the ski area, which continues to bring back diehard fans (aka ‘Coneheads’) year after year.

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